[These pages concern interesting correspondence between our translators and project managers at KENAX, mostly concerning the famous Jade Dynasty translation project.]

French Files Quotation Translators

Let me know if you are still interested in this position.

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Yes they will.

” yes “Ok, here are re-vetted file German 18b, and changed comments to it.

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Here are re-vetted files German 18h and 18j, and changed comments to them.

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Here is maybe an issue in the uploaded file French 11h.
Please check out lines 101,102.
I found difference about translation LV105 and NV105.
But I was in to the text and figure out ,that it is abbreviation from level 105 and niveau 105 accordingly.
But… I was trough the instruction “VettingUpdate” again and saw :
ENGLISH: Canine Duoblade Recipe(LV15)
-Translation :Eckzahn-Doppelkling.-Rez.(LV15).
So as you see, LV15 remain untranslated.
I think I was confused about brackets, because here brackets are round, but in the following text in the instruction were mentioned square brackets, like this < >.
Please explain me brackets thing.
Do we have to follow both kinds of brackets? Do we have to see if remain unchanged only special characters, like LV15?
Because both kind of brackets are used all over the files.

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this is the job you’ve assigned me. please take a look.

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In German level (LV) is Level (LV), but in French level is niveau (NV). So it’s fine.
The « » marks are not brackets ([{}]), they are called guillemets and they are species of quotes.

As to the whole question of French quotes, this is the answer I received from the lead translator:
________________________________________

The quotation marks we traditionally use in France look like this: « ».
However, people also use “…” they’re pretty common as well.

ly, if you want my opinion, we have like 100 problems with the French, the quotation marks thing is really the last one we should worry about. Plus I suspect Transit interprets the French quotation marks as special characters (code lines or whatever).
_______________________________________________

So here is the answer – ignore it. If in English for some reason there are guillemets around some word, and in French they are same – don’t change. But as usual quote marks in the files ordinary “” can be used.

Next, I asked about conversions – in some files translators converted yards, inches etc. to centimeters and meters. I asked what is the common agreement about it. Here is the answer.
______________________________________________________

In France we use metric values so miles, inches, yards, etc. don’t mean anything for us. I have seen the conversions too and I don’t really know what to think.

Basically we are forced to use “meters” instead of “yards”, etc.

Anyway, as usual we can prevent any trouble by keeping consistency: either we convert all the amounts like 1,09 yards become 1 meter or we just convert all the metric units like 1 yard becomes 1 meter. The important thing is to avoid doing both. As long as we stick with either one or the other we should be fine with the quest instructions.
__________________________________________

So I would summarize it like this – since there are many non metric measurements, and not all of them correspond to metric system, i.e. if yard is quite close to meter, inch is not close to cm, and 100 inches are NOT one yard, it makes more sense to mathematically convert, just how did translators in few files. So if you see numbers, you can take a fast look that they were converted and not just word yard/inch was replaced by meter/cm.

I guess it summarizes and closes the issue of measurements and quotes. I will delete all comments I left on the subject from the files.

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One more thing, some abbreviates for French:

HP – PV
SP – ES
DEF – DEF
ACC – PRE
EVA – EVA
LV – NV

Level – Niveau

Stun Res – Res. Etourdir
Paralyze Res – Res. Paralysie
Sleep Res – Res. Sommeil
Weaken Res – Res. Affaiblir
Silence Res. Res. Silence

———————-

I was checking some points regarding the French files. There was an issue, that instead of the classical French-style quotes, in all files were used the usual ones “.”. And other issue we spotted, was that in some files, translators converted measurements form yards, miles and inches to metric system. And finally, French uses some different translations of abbreviations. Again, I asked French Lead Translator what is the common agreement about it.

Here are his answers with my comments, let me know if it’s clear.
__________________________________________
Abbreviations:

In German level (LV) is Level (LV), but in French level is niveau (NV). Other abbreviations:
HP – PV
SP – ES
DEF – DEF
ACC – PRE
EVA – EVA
LV – NV

Level – Niveau

Stun Res – Res. Etourdir
Paralyze Res – Res. Paralysie
Sleep Res – Res. Sommeil
Weaken Res – Res. Affaiblir
Silence Res. Res. Silence
__________________________________________

As to the whole question of French quotes, this is the answer I received from the lead translator:
________________________________________
Quotes issue:

The quotation marks we traditionally use in France look like this: « ».
However, people also use “…” they’re pretty common as well.

ly, if you want my opinion, we have like 100 problems with the French, the quotation marks thing is really the last one we should worry about. Plus I suspect Transit interprets the French quotation marks as special characters (code lines or whatever).
_______________________________________________

So here is the answer – ignore it. If in English for some reason there are « » around some word, and in French they are same – don’t change. But as usual quote marks in the files ordinary “” can be used.

Next, I asked about conversions – in some files translators converted yards, inches etc. to centimeters and meters. I asked what is the common agreement about it. Here is the answer.
______________________________________________________
Measurements:

In France we use metric values so miles, inches, yards, etc. don’t mean anything for us. I have seen the conversions too and I don’t really know what to think.

Basically we are forced to use “meters” instead of “yards”, etc.

Anyway, as usual we can prevent any trouble by keeping consistency: either we convert all the amounts like 1,09 yards become 1 meter or we just convert all the metric units like 1 yard becomes 1 meter. The important thing is to avoid doing both. As long as we stick with either one or the other we should be fine with the quest instructions.
__________________________________________

So I would summarize it like this – since there are many non metric measurements, and not all of them correspond to metric system, i.e. if yard is quite close to meter, inch is not close to cm, and 100 inches are NOT one yard, it makes more sense to mathematically convert, just how did translators in few files. So if you see numbers, you can take a fast look that they were converted and not just word yard/inch was replaced by meter/cm.

I am waiting for files, and hope to have today a bunch of them.

———————-

San

Then you for the file, I will check it now.
Here is some issue related to vetting French files you should know about:

I was checking some points regarding the French files. There was an issue, that instead of the classical French-style quotes, in all files were used the usual ones “.”. And other issue we spotted, was that in some files, translators converted measurements form yards, miles and inches to metric system. And finally, French uses some different translations of abbreviations. Again, I asked French Lead Translator what is the common agreement about it.

Here are his answers with my comments, let me know if it’s clear.
__________________________________________
Abbreviations:

In German level (LV) is Level (LV), but in French level is niveau (NV). Other abbreviations:
HP – PV
SP – ES
DEF – DEF
ACC – PRE
EVA – EVA
LV – NV

Level – Niveau

Stun Res – Res. Etourdir
Paralyze Res – Res. Paralysie
Sleep Res – Res. Sommeil
Weaken Res – Res. Affaiblir
Silence Res. Res. Silence
__________________________________________

As to the whole question of French quotes, this is the answer I received from the lead translator:
________________________________________
Quotes issue:

The quotation marks we traditionally use in France look like this: « ».
However, people also use “…” they’re pretty common as well.

ly, right now we have more significant problems with French, the quotation marks thing is really the last one we should worry about. Plus I suspect Transit interprets the French quotation marks as special characters (code lines or whatever).

kenax

CEO at KENAX
Almost all the "articles" I have submitted to this wordpress site have been email correspondence with our translators on larger projects, so that anyone interested in starting a career as a translator might get an idea what it would be like.
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